Home > Education, Learners, Teachers, Teaching > Teaching for Learning – Why Helping Learners Earn their Learning Matters

Teaching for Learning – Why Helping Learners Earn their Learning Matters

A while ago I wrote a text about teaching, and even though teaching is one of the key elements in lessons, learning is, obviously, part and parcel of the process that takes place in lessons – it’s the actual aim of lessons. If teaching is a lot more than transmitting information, learning is more than simply receiving information. What does learning imply, then?

Learning implies being able to transform information into knowledge, first and foremost. For one reason, information is widely available to anyone who’s got access to the World Wide Web, but the only thing this has done is leveling the play field for those who have access to the wealth of information the Internet provides. Those who live in areas where Internet access is nothing but an idea inspired by a sci-fi book should, therefore, fear that the gap is only going to increase between those who have access to the Internet and those who are still oblivious to this world. But who said information is the same thing as knowledge?

Being knowledgeable means you’re able to purposefully and intentionally use information to tackle the myriad challenges you face in life. If all you are able to do is retrieve an event from memory and repeat the same steps, you haven’t necessarily learnt anything. If, on the other hand, you’re able to use information from a past experience, assess what could work for the situation at hand, you can probably say you’ve been able to transform that piece of information into knowledge. This may help in the creation of possible solutions to future endeavours.

What I mean to say here is that knowledge – on most occasions – precedes creativity. It’s a lot easier for us to come up with creative solutions for problems once we’ve been able to transform the information into something a lot more relevant than a simple memory of something to be reproduced. When we’re able to come up with our own solutions for a problem, learning has taken place. It goes far beyond simply being able to apply the information we’ve received to another situation, though that is part of the process.

Learning implies a willingness to go further, which demands a good deal of effort. Learning does not take place if there’s no effort involved. It is the degree of effort involved in the learning process that will make the difference between being informed and being knowledgeable. It’s the fine line that divides learning from just remembering for a short period of time. If you want to learn something, you’ve got to earn it. If you’ve earned it, you’ve learned it.

We’ve all been told that education is the one thing no one can take away from us. This is so because education is not something that is bestowed upon us; it is something we need to work hard to achieve. Fortunately, until we reach the point of autonomy, the tipping point at which it’s a lot easier for us to develop on our own, teaching makes the difference.

Teaching, however, is only effective when it instigates learners to think. At the end of the day, teaching doesn’t have to be fun to be effective, though it’s easy to see that we tend to dedicate ourselves a lot harder to learn something that is fun. Teaching can, obviously, benefit from engagement on the part of the learner, but to get down to what really matters: teaching, in order to be effective, must ultimately be thought-provoking. Effective teaching is the kind of teaching that leads learners to make an effort to use their reason and make sense of things. It is paramount that learners be required to think and pay attention in order to learn.

Needless to say, learning, just like teaching, is a complicated concept to define and to contextualise. Yet, it’s clear to me that for learning to take place learners need to be challenged to the point of making an effort to want to go further. Learning as a process doesn’t benefit from always having someone making things easier and easier, or a lot more fun. Learning precedes fun because it is, in itself, motivating and engaging as long as real learning is happening.

The relationship you build with your students does matter a lot more than you may want to believe when you think of their success. | Photo by Vandy CFT on Flickr

The relationship you build with your students does matter a lot more than you may want to believe when you think of their success. | Photo by Vandy CFT on Flickr

This is why learning should be seen as a dialogic process, co-constructed between the teacher and the learner. It is why the Socratic method of questioning still awes and works when applied effectively. At the risk of sounding trite, learning is not about providing the right answers, but it is all about asking the right questions. Questions are the fuel for continuous learning. And in order to ask the right questions, teachers must learn to listen and react to what their learners are saying. Learning won’t occur simply because someone has told you that you have to learn A or B, but it may work if you yourself are somehow forced into finding the answers for A or B.

Ultimately, learning doesn’t depend on formal teaching, but any kind of teaching may foster or hinder learning. What kind of teaching fosters learning? What can teachers do in the classroom to make effective learning take place? The answer lies in the kind of relationship the learner and the teacher establish. It doesn’t take anything else than a teacher and a learner for learning to take place, and it also takes nothing but the relationship between the teacher and the learner to ruin learning. Is it somehow clear how important it is for you to earn the right to teach if you say your teaching is focussed on learning? Do you help your learners to earn their learning? And if all you want is a catchy ending, does your teaching put the EARN in LEARN?

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  1. Marco Tulio O. Bittencourt
    March 24, 2013 at 1:37 pm

    I enjoyed Henrick. Asking the right questions is the key. Guiding and monitoring so the students can indeed find the answers is the key. It was nice to see Socrates’ dialogic process into action and relevant in these days. Cool stuff!!!

    • March 25, 2013 at 3:28 pm

      Hi Marco,

      Asking the right questions that will force learners to think on their own is the key. I guess teachers end up underestimating learners subconsciously at times just because we feel it’s our job to make everything easier for them. Sometimes, we need the so-called difficulties in order to learn, right?!

      • Marco Tulio O. Bittencourt
        March 25, 2013 at 3:38 pm

        couldn’t agree more!!! And, maybe from these situations natural acquisition will arise.

  2. June 8, 2013 at 7:31 pm

    In an ELT era marked by people’s relentless pursuit for fun, quick answers and no-nonsense solutions, it’s refreshing to read stuff like this. Keep doing what you’re doing, Henrick.

    • June 11, 2013 at 6:09 pm

      Hi Luiz,

      Many thanks for the comment. It’s always good to hear that there are others also bothered by the excess of attention given to having fun and leaving learning behind, believing that it’ll always take place incidentally. It’s not always like that, right?! I’ll be coming to the blog with more frequent posts pretty soon. In the meantime, I’ve only been able to lurk here and there reading some blog posts from some inspiring people, such as you. Too bad we couldn’t meet in Goiânia.

      Cheers!

  3. August 4, 2013 at 5:34 pm

    A text worth reading over and over again/sharing and discussing. Thank you!

    • September 1, 2013 at 12:47 pm

      Hi Rose!

      Always a pleasure to hear that from you! :)

      Henrick

  4. October 19, 2013 at 12:49 am

    Excellent post. Made me think about my own way of teaching. Teachers have a very crucial role in the lives of their students. Students can tag a subject as boring or exciting depending on the teacher. That’s why some students hate Math because of the teacher’s fault. They give boring lessons and exercises.

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